Whoopi Goldberg's Candid Message on Abortion

 

"I did all this shit so we wouldn't have to do it again" ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌


It's About More Than a Hijab

 

 

What Iranian women are really protesting ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌


Iranian Women Are Burning Their Hijabs

 

 

What you need to know about the protests ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌


The Black Filmmakers You May Not Have Heard Of

 

 

Also: Puerto Rico's power is out. Still. ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌


Womanhood Is Not a Zero-Sum Game

 

 

Plus: A huge new study on abortion despair ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌


Queen Elizabeth's Complicated Legacy

 

 

There is no one way to process her death. ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌


The Steubenville Rape Case, Ten Years Later

 

 

What we have and haven't learned ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌


Grieving Princess Diana Let Me Mourn My Brother

 

 

A writer reflects on her own loss ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌


I Asked 61 Colleges If They Would Pay for Students to Travel for an Abortion. Only Five Hinted That They Might.

BY TALIA KANTOR LIEBER

On the morning that Roe v. Wade fell, I turned to my father and declared I would not be attending college in a state where I could not legally have an abortion. 

Strikethroughs began to appear on my running list of potential schools, a document that is growing and shifting as I enter my junior year of high school. I knew I was in a position of privilege: If I did go to college in one of the 14 states where abortion was banned, I’d have the financial means to travel if I needed to. But that isn't true for many of my friends and classmates. And even with the ability to pay, there are so many students—myself included—who don’t want to take that chance. In fact, a recent survey found that over a third of students seeking higher-ed degrees say the Dobbs decision will affect which institution they attend. 

So an idea occurred to me. After the Supreme Court’s ruling, many private companies promised to cover the travel expenses of employees seeking out-of-state abortions (much to the chagrin of some state lawmakers). Why couldn’t colleges do the same? After all, shouldn’t the aim of any school be to support its students, and rid them of any obstacles disrupting their education? 

I decided to compile a list of schools in states where abortion is banned (or at high risk of being banned) and ask them one simple question: Would they cover the travel expenses of students forced to seek an out-of-state abortion? 

Here’s what I found.

Of the 61 schools I surveyed, only five gave me anything close to a yes. The College of Wooster, Kenyon College, Oberlin College, the University of Idaho, and Vanderbilt University referenced “emergency” or “Student Success” funds that students could potentially access for abortion care or abortion-related travel expenses.  

Twenty-one schools—mostly smaller, private institutions—gave ambiguous answers, either saying they were still developing plans or simply stating their commitment to their students. 

Nine schools—mostly large public universities—said that they would not pay for travel or had not discussed the topic. 

And 26 schools, almost evenly split between public and private, did not respond to repeated requests for comment, even as their students began to set foot on campus. 

All in all, the vast majority of the schools I called (which, by rough calculations, are attended by at least 480,000 students who could become pregnant) were not ready to help those students access crucial abortion care. 

Read the full list of schools’ responses here.

SO WHY ARE SCHOOLS NOT STEPPING UP THE WAY PRIVATE COMPANIES DID?

Schools are scrambling to create policies around abortion travel, and the reasons are complex. First, there are legal fears, especially for public universities whose budgets are controlled by the same legislatures that banned abortion in the first place. States such as Missouri have laws in place that prohibit the use of public funds for “performing or assisting abortion.” A public institution’s money may very well fall under that category. Other states’ abortion laws are too in flux, or not definitive enough for schools to create concrete policies.

Some states have even begun to explore legislation that outlaws crossing state lines for an abortion. According to Kimberley Harris, a constitutional law professor at Texas Tech University School of Law, “there is supposedly a constitutional right of interstate travel, or at least there has been in the past, but we’ve kind of seen what can happen with constitutional rights.” Bans such as these could even prohibit private schools from supporting abortion-related travel. 

And colleges must not only consider the question of where students may go, but the details of their abortions as well. Harris notes the case of Sidley Austin, a law firm that promised to pay for employees to go out-of-state to acquire abortion pills. The firm is facing legal threats from a group of Texas Republicans who claim that Sidley Austin facilitated “illegal” abortions. In a letter to the firm, they argued that “criminal prohibitions extend to drug-induced abortions if any part of the drug regimen is ingested in Texas, even if the drugs were dispensed by an out-of-state abortionist.” If a school were to pay for a student’s abortion travel, says Harris, it could leave the institution susceptible to a similar legal threat. 

These questions of liability, Harris explains, may prevent many schools—especially public institutions or those with religious affiliations—from paying. “A lot of colleges are very risk-averse when it comes to this,” she says. “There is a whole lot of fear.” Paying for students’ travel could fall under the category of aiding or abetting abortion, an action that civilians can now be rewarded for reporting in certain states. 

That fear may also affect a college’s medical providers or counselors. Telling students abortion is legal in neighboring states has little risk, but Harris believes that providing a direct referral could be riskier. “I think it will be more hinted at,” she said. In other words, a pregnant student could ask their school for support and be turned away—not only without medical care or travel funds, but without any clear advice.

University of Kentucky, one of many institutions yet to clarify whether it will help students. (Image by Michael Hickey via Getty Images)

THE CHAOS IN STATE ABORTION LAW—AND HOW IT AFFECTS SCHOOLS

As the answers from schools came in, I felt outraged thinking about the students who would have no institutional support if they needed an abortion. But I also noticed that these schools were just as confused as the students applying to them. Many gave me unclear or placeholder statements, likely because this is uncharted legal territory for them. Beyond travel, colleges are facing an onslaught of questions about abortion in a post-Roe world: How will they protect students' privacy given that, as Jessica Valenti has reported, college students are often not covered by medical privacy laws? Will lack of access to abortion impact other reproductive or medical care at college health centers? And will health centers themselves understand how to respond to the new laws? (A Chronicle of Higher Education survey implies they may not.)

Even the use of emergency funds raises questions about records left by financial transactions, which could serve as legal evidence. And it’s unclear whether students on campuses with funds are even aware those resources exist; colleges generally have an alarming track record when it comes to helping their students put emergency funds to use.  

The outlook is grim. But as I spoke to representatives from the schools surveyed, I began to feel sympathetic toward each party involved. Administrators are creating plans with incomplete legal information and an unclear sense of what the ramifications could be. College students are coming to campus unsure of where their school stands or what to do if they or someone they know needs an abortion.

But one thing is clear: This fall, in every state, students will show up on campus and they will, for a variety of reasons, seek out abortions.

What is less clear is what colleges will do to protect them. 

WHAT THE SCHOOLS SAID

The 61 colleges and universities in this list are located in 21 states which have either enacted abortion bans or are among those considered likely to do so.. (We also included Florida, which constitutionally protects abortion but has enacted a 15-week ban likely to impact students.) These schools are a mix of the most highly attended schools from each state and smaller, highly-ranked liberal arts schools. Like the American college landscape in general, they include public, private, and religiously affiliated institutions.

I asked each school: Will you pay for the travel expenses of students who need to seek abortions out of state? (Note: I categorized as a “yes” any school with a fund or support that would allow this travel, even if the school itself stopped short of explicit support of abortion travel or made clear that its policy is not to inquire about how the funds are used.)

 

Agnes Scott College

Decatur, Georgia

No comment.

A spokesperson from Agnes Scott College stated that “there is no comment at this time.” 


Arizona State University

Tempe, Arizona

No. 

If abortion were to become illegal in the state, Arizona State University told us it will not pay for the travel expenses of students who seek access to abortion.


Auburn University

Auburn, Alabama

No response. 

Auburn University did not respond to requests for comment.


Baylor University

Waco, Texas 

No response. 

Baylor University did not respond to requests for comment. 


Berea College

Berea, Kentucky

No response.

Berea College did not respond to requests for comment. 


Brigham Young University

Provo, Utah

No response. 

Brigham Young University did not respond to requests for comment. 


Case Western Reserve University

Cleveland, Ohio

Under review. 

Case Western Reserve has not stated whether it will cover students’ travel expenses. A university spokesperson stated that the school is “carefully assessing the situation and has convened a task force to assess all aspects of the decision and its implications for our faculty, students and staff.”


Centre College

Danville, Kentucky

Under review. 

A spokesperson for Centre College said the college is “studying the legal restrictions and requirements, and they are in flux until the courts in Kentucky make final decisions on what bans are actually in place.” 


Clemson University

Clemson, South Carolina

No response. 

Clemson University did not respond to requests for comment.


College of Wooster

Wooster, Ohio

Yes, through an emergency fund. 

A College of Wooster spokesperson stated that “if a student needs health care services that are not available locally, the College will support them in accessing care as nearby as possible. For some types of reproductive health care, such as abortion, that may mean assisting a student in accessing care in another state, for example. As for all medical care, students are eligible to apply for emergency funds from the Dean of Students’ office to support urgent reproductive healthcare, including abortion.” In a follow-up statement, ​​the spokesperson said, “Students are able to request emergency travel funds from The College of Wooster for any reason. We will not require documentation of the specific need out of respect for the privacy of the individual.”


Cornell College

Mount Vernon, Iowa

No response. 

Cornell College did not respond to requests for comment.


Denison University

Granville, Ohio 

Under review. 

Denison University has not explicitly stated whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A spokesperson stated, “We are still assessing both our existing resources and potential new resources. We do anticipate expanding our resources to ensure our campus community members have access to the health care they need.”


DePauw University

Greencastle, Indiana

No response. 

DePauw University did not respond to requests for comment.


Earlham College

Richmond, Indiana

Under review. 

An Earlham College spokesperson said that the school is “evaluating all of our options to support a woman's right to reproductive healthcare” but could not provide an answer yet on whether it will reimburse students for travel expenses.


Emory University 

Atlanta, Georgia

Unclear. 

Emory University has not explicitly stated whether it will cover students’ travel expenses. A spokesperson pointed to a statement by Student Health Services, which reads,Students should contact EUSHIP [Emory University Student Health Insurance Plan] directly to learn what support resources are available when a medical procedure is not available locally.”


Florida State University

Tallahassee, Florida

No response. 

Florida State University did not respond to requests for comment.


Furman University 

Greenville, South Carolina

Unclear. 

Furman University has not stated whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A spokesperson for the school pointed to a statement from President Elizabeth Davis, which says, “For our students, Furman will continue to provide education about and access to contraception and other healthcare services, as well as counseling for students who have pregnancy concerns, including providing information about prenatal care and available options for terminating a pregnancy.”


Georgia Institute of Technology 

Atlanta, Georgia

No response. 

Georgia Institute of Technology did not respond to requests for comment.


Grinnell College

Grinnell, Iowa

No response. 

Grinnell College did not respond to requests for comment.


Hanover College

Hanover, Indiana

No response. 

Hanover College did not respond to requests for comment.


Hendrix College

Conway, Arkansas

Unclear.

In July, a Hendrix College spokesperson said the school could not give an answer because the “policy review/revisions relating to the coming semester will take place over the next several weeks, as they do every summer.” They did not reply when asked for a follow-up comment in August.


Indiana University-Bloomington

Bloomington, Indiana

Unclear. 

“Until state legislation is passed, it’s too premature for us to determine if or how IU might be impacted,” said a spokesperson for Indiana University-Bloomington in July. The state has since enacted an abortion ban, but the university told us in August that it is “still assessing the impact and assessing any steps we may need to take for our employees.”


Kenyon College

Gambier, Ohio

Yes, through a "Student Success Fund." 

A Kenyon College spokesperson sent us a statement that the school’s senior staff had made addressing reproductive health. It reminds students of a "Student Success Fund that offers financial assistance to students for a range of circumstances. Students may apply for these funds if they are experiencing hardship of any kind, whether or not they qualify for other forms of financial aid.


Louisiana State University

New Orleans, Louisiana

No response.

Louisiana State University did not respond to requests for comment.


Oberlin College

Oberlin, Ohio

Yes, through the use of emergency funds.

In a statement on reproductive health, Oberlin College President Carmen Ambar said: “We will also continue to work with the Oberlin Doula Collective, which provides support and community for those seeking abortions. And while we have never inquired about the exact purpose of a student’s use of emergency funds needed for health procedures, these funds will still be available to those who meet its criteria.”


Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio

Unclear, implied no. 

Ohio State University “remains deeply committed to the health, safety and well-being of our students… and is closely examining the decision from the Supreme Court and changes in state law,” said a university spokesperson. “If necessary, Ohio State and the medical center will make adjustments to services, course offerings or resources to be in compliance with the law…” The spokesperson also mentioned the University's health care plan for its faculty and staff, which cites the Ohio law that public funds can not legally be spent on elective abortions—amounting to an implicit, if not explicit no.


Ohio Wesleyan University

Delaware, Ohio

Under review. 

Ohio Wesleyan University has not explicitly stated whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A spokesperson said that the school is “considering options to assist students, faculty, or staff who need access to women’s reproductive services that may be more inaccessible as a result of the recent court decision. We will be providing more information to our community when it is available.”


Purdue University

West Lafayette, Indiana

No response. 

Purdue University did not respond to requests for comment.


Rhodes College

Memphis, Tennessee 

Under review. 

Rhodes College has not stated whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A spokesperson said, “President Collins has assembled a task force to help the college address critical issues and questions resulting from the Supreme Court’s June 24 decision. They will begin meeting soon.”


Rice University 

Houston, Texas

Under review. 

Rice University has not stated whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A university spokesperson highlighted a statement that former President David Leebron had made, which says that the school is “exploring how we can best continue to appropriately support the reproductive rights of our community, including access to abortion services. We…will share relevant information in as timely a manner as possible.


Southern Methodist University

Dallas, Texas

No response.

Southern Methodist University did not respond to requests for comment.


Southwestern University 

Georgetown, Texas

No.

Southwestern University told us that the school will not pay for the travel expenses of students seeking access to abortion.


Spelman College

Atlanta, Georgia 

No comment.

Spelman College declined to comment on whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A university spokesperson stated that the school is “closely monitoring the Title IX proposed rules and will make necessary updates based on the final regulations. Title IX has always provided protections regarding pregnancy and parenting. We will continue to assist our community members in accordance with the Title IX regulations and the values of Spelman College.”


Texas A&M University 

College Station, Texas

No.

Texas A&M will not pay for its students’ travel expenses when seeking access to abortion. According to a spokesperson for the university: “Student Health Services does not supply funding for travel or medical care outside of our health center. It is only for on-campus medical needs; no surgeries are performed there (nor have they ever). So, for example, if a student had cancer, they would have to seek treatment elsewhere.”


Texas Christian University

Fort Worth, Texas

No comment.

Texas Christian University has not stated whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A spokesperson told us they did not have information to share.


Transylvania University

Lexington, Kentucky

No comment.

A spokesperson for Transylvania University said that, to their knowledge, the school has “not held any discussions on the topic.”


Tulane University 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

No response.

Tulane University did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Alabama 

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

No response.

The University of Alabama did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

No response.

The University of Arizona did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas

Unclear.

The University of Arkansas has not stated whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A spokesperson for the university stated, “The Pat Walker Health Center on campus is dedicated to supporting the health and well-being of the campus community and will abide by state and federal law.”


University of Florida

Gainesville, Florida

No.

Asked whether it might cover students’ out-of-state travel, a spokesperson for the University of Florida said that they were “not aware of any such plans.”


University of Georgia

Athens, Georgia

No response.

The University of Georgia did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Idaho

Moscow, Idaho

Yes, though only through the use of donated (not school-provided) emergency funds.

A spokesperson from the University of Idaho said that the school “does not provide money specifically for students to travel for an abortion. The university does have emergency funds available to students. These small allocations of donated dollars (typically a couple hundred dollars) are given out without verification of need or use. While it is possible a student could use it for this, the university does not get involved in the medical decisions of our students….We provide information and resources that allow students to make informed and independent decisions.”


University of Iowa

Iowa City, Iowa

No response. 

The University of Iowa did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Kentucky

Lexington, Kentucky

Unclear. 

A spokesperson stated, “UK’s insurance plans do not cover elective abortions. We are in the process of analyzing the impacts of the Supreme Court’s decision as we move forward in compliance with state law.”


University of Miami

Miami, Florida

No response. 

The University of Miami did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Mississippi 

Oxford, Mississippi

No.

The University of Mississippi will not pay for the travel expenses of students seeking access to abortion.“The university only covers travel expenses for students when they are traveling on university-related business,” said a spokesperson.


University of Missouri 

Columbia, Missouri

No. 

The University of Missouri will not pay for the travel expenses of students seeking access to abortion. A spokesperson provided further context, explaining that “prior to the Dobbs decision, Missouri state law that was already in place prohibits university funds, employees and facilities from being used in any way to perform abortions.”


University of North Dakota 

Grand Forks, North Dakota

No.

The University of North Dakota will not pay for the travel expenses of students seeking access to abortion. The school “does not have any policies in place to cover the cost for travel,” said a spokesperson.


University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame, Indiana

No response.

The University of Notre Dame did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Oklahoma

Norman, Oklahoma

Unclear. 

The University of Oklahoma has not stated whether it would cover students’ travel expenses. A spokesperson said the school’s “top focus is supporting the needs, aspirations, and well-being of our students. While the university must and will comply with all applicable laws, we remain unwavering in our commitment to serve our students to the fullest extent possible.”


University of South Carolina 

Columbia, South Carolina

No response.

The University of South Carolina did not respond to requests for comment.


University of South Dakota

Vermillion, South Dakota

No response.

The University of South Dakota did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Tennessee 

Knoxville, Tennessee

No. 

The University of Tennessee told us that it will not pay for the travel expenses of students seeking access to abortion.


University of Texas at Austin

Austin, Texas

Unclear.

The University of Texas at Austin has not stated whether it would pay the travel expenses of students seeking abortion care. A spokesperson noted that University Health Services “does not dispense abortive medications, provide abortion services or obstetrical/prenatal services.”


University of Texas at Dallas

Dallas, Texas

No response.

The University of Texas at Dallas did not respond to requests for comment.


University of Utah

Salt Lake City, Utah

No.

The University of Utah told us that it will not pay for its students’ travel expenses when seeking access to abortion.


University of Wyoming

Laramie, Wyoming

No response. 

The University of Wyoming did not respond to requests for comment.


Vanderbilt University 

Nashville, Tennessee

Yes, through a “Student Critical Support Fund.”

A Vanderbilt University spokesperson pointed to a statement from the school, which explains that students will have the opportunity to apply for financial support from the “Student Critical Support Fund, formerly the Student Hardship Fund, that aids with unexpected expenses, including costs related to any medical procedure not available in Tennessee. Details on how to apply will be shared in the coming weeks.”


Washington University at St. Louis

St. Louis, Missouri 

No comment. 

Washington University at St. Louis declined to comment beyond a statement made by the school’s Chancellor Andrew Martin and Dean David Perlmutter, which reads that “we must keep our focus squarely on the mission of the university — research, education, and patient care.”


Wofford College

Spartanburg, South Carolina

No response. 

Wofford College did not respond to requests for comment.


Don’t see your school on this list, but wondering what its policy might be? Call the Dean of Students—or the department in charge of student life—or the President and ask. Here’s the wording I used: Will [insert college] cover travel expenses for students who travel out of state to seek an abortion? 

If you do reach out to your administrators, send us an email at [email protected] and let us know what they say. As abortion laws change, we’ll be updating this list—with more states—this fall.


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